Aloo gobi in the crockpot


This week has been hectic. Between trying to maintain what fragile traction I have on my fourth dissertation chapter, jumping “once more into the breach” of the Spring semester, and dealing with Week 2 of the toddler’s virus(es), I haven’t had much time for blogging (or exercise or knitting or reading or doing much other than staring slack-jawed at the TV after the kids go to bed). But I did want to share this recipe for Aloo gobi, which was on the menu this week for Meatless Monday.

I really love Indian food, but have had middling luck making it at home. A couple of years ago, I made a full Indian meal for some friends, including biryani, saag paneer, and kheer (plus premade samosas and naan). I roasted and ground the spices and refused to cut any corners in assembling the food. (Which is probably why I haven’t done such a stunt since.) A few months back, I made chicken tikka masala and it was pretty good. And a while back, I made palaak tofu in the crockpot and it was blandy bland blanderson. But yummy.

So, I approached this recipe with measured expectations, hoping it would be good, but fully cognizant of the fact that it may well be awful. Surprise! It wasn’t! The only problem was that I needed to either cook it longer or cut the potatoes smaller because they weren’t done after three hours. But the leftovers are delicious and next time I’ll add tofu for a bit of protein.

Crockpot Aloo Gobi
adapted from The Indian Slow Cooker

1 large cauliflower, washed and cut into bite-sized pieces
1 large Russet potato, peeled and diced
1 medium yellow onion, peeled and diced
1 medium tomato, diced
4 cloves garlic, minced (I used a garlic press)
1 largeish serrano (the original calls for 3-4 green Thai peppers or serranos, but I’ve got to mind the Scovilles with the small ones around.) (Not that they ate any of it.)
1 T cumin seeds
1 T red chili powder
1 T garam masala
1 T salt (I was so relieved to see this much salt in the recipe! I am so sick of underseasoned recipes!)
1 t turmeric powder
3 T canola oil (make sure you’re using non-GMO canola oil; I use Spectrum. I reckon if you’re anti-canola in general, you could use butter instead or regular old vegetable oil)

(The cookbook also calls for a heaping T of chopped cilantro, but I don’t know why you’d want to ruin your dish with that foul herb.)

Put all the ingredients in the crockpot. Cook on low for three hours (or more, if necessary). Stir occasionally. Don’t worry if the cauliflower seems crunchy; it will eventually soften and release liquid. (Here’s where you add cilantro, if you want to ruin your meal.) Serve with rice or naan, or if you’re me, both. Yay, carbs!

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5 Comments

  1. Ugh…dissertations and starting the new semester…I can relate! (I cannot, however, relate to your hatred of cilantro, lol). I’ve been trying to cook more ethnic food but yes, it is often so complicated! So thanks for sharing this crockpot Indian recipe!

    Reply
  2. i am definitely going to try this next week! thank you for the recipe!!

    Reply
  3. Utilitycook

     /  August 3, 2012

    Tried this, it tasted great! quite straight forward and you are right about the cauliflower releasing liquids at the end, I added a little water and it ended up watery.

    Reply
    • boxingoctopus

       /  November 4, 2012

      Glad you liked it! Were you able to drain off the excess water?

      Reply
  4. agree with you Indian dishes may seem like very elaborate and complicated to make, but many dishes can be made very simple slightly adapting them for slow-cooker. I do that all the time for convenience. 🙂

    Reply

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